Castle Dungeons with an English Heritage Pass

Dover Castle

Underneath some of England's most famous castles are crypts, secret tunnels and of course, dungeons. No other part of a castle conjures up more intrigue and fascination. Hidden beneath the visible surface, dungeons are the setting for some of the most gruesome stories in British history.

Available with an English Heritage Pass

Pevensey Castle

Pevensey Castle, South East England, was a state prison in the 15th Century and later became a private one for the more upmarket detainee. There are two dungeons, one of which is a typical oubliette only accessible via a trap door, and the other is reached via a spiral staircase.

The castle is also said to be haunted by a ‘Lady in White,’ a ghost whose identity has two possibilities, Joan of Navarre or Lady Joan Pelham. A hidden tunnel has also recently been unearthed, local folklore linking it to a house called Priesthawes in nearby Westham.

Tintagel Castle

Underneath the wind-swept castle of Tintagel lies a cave which stars in one of the most popular legends of all time. It is said that King Arthur was conceived at Tintagel, and his protectorate and tutor Merlin the Wizard inhabited a cave below Tintagel Castle - visible today.

Dover Castle

Behind the austere fortress walls at Dover Castle, all may seem peaceful now, but lurking below the floorboards are secret chambers and underground passages, dating back to medieval times. Dover Castle has been at the forefront of Britain’s defense for centuries; repelling assaults from French invaders to playing a crucial role in the World War Two.

dover-doom

Making for a truly enlightening and fascinating experience, today you can explore the tunnels including the World War Two underground hospital, and discover some of the secrets and stories from the turbulent war years.

Carlisle Castle

No stranger to chaos and its fair share of cruelty, Carlisle Castle in North West England boasts an impressive record of royal plots and prisoners, including Mary, Queen of Scots. However it is in the dungeons below which saw a more common breed of prisoner, and in which lies a brutal reminder of a sinister story the castle has to tell.

Prisoners held during the Jacobite War were kept in such appalling conditions that they were reduced to licking the walls of the dungeon for moisture. Coined the ‘licking stones,’ these haunting relics can be seen in the castle today.

Farleigh and Hungerford Castle

Farleigh and Hungerford(1)

Farleigh and Hungerford Castle, South West England is where visitors can see some very unusual and unique artefacts lurking in the Castle’s crypt...

Some of the finest human shaped lead coffins in the country can be found in the crypt at Farleigh and Hungerford Castle, a chamber situated beneath the Castle’s chapel. Making this excellent assortment especially remarkable is the collection of death masks which accompany them. A wax or plaster cast impression of a person’s face, death masks were taken shortly after death in order to create portraits or serve as a memento or keepsake of the deceased.

??Did you know??

Forming part of the castle’s keep, dungeons are the last defensive part of a castle. Synonymous with imprisonment and torture, often when people refer to a dungeon they actually mean an oubliette. A French term, an oubliette translates as “a little place of forgetting.” An underground chamber, shaped like a beehive, an oubliette is only accessible from the outside in via a trapdoor at the top. For prisoners this meant that escape was impossible and unfortunately often death by starvation, as the discreet and hidden location meant that captors neglected to provide food or water, literally forgetting about them.

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